Journeying together in Christ

The Cruciform Life: Ruth

The Cruciform Life, Ruth by: William Morrow St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Kingston ON March 31, 2019 Texts: Ruth 1:8-18; 4:13-17; Luke 1:46-55 This morning I am wearing a rose-coloured stole. I am wearing this stole because this Sunday is celebrated as “Laetare Sunday” or “Rose Sunday” in some Christian traditions. The colour Rose is a symbol of joyful praise. Today, we are…

The Cruciform Life: Jeremiah

The Cruciform Life: Jeremiah by William Morrow St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Kingston ON March 24, 2019 Texts: Jeremiah 20:7-13; Mark 15:25-39 I wonder how many of us would find the following want-ad attractive? “Prophet wanted. Must be prepared for constant conflict, physical abuse and verbal harassment. Arrest and arbitrary detention a possibility. No pay. No benefits. No time for family life.” All…

The Cruciform Life: Moses

The Cruciform Life: Moses by William Morrow St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Kingston ON March 17, 2019 Texts: Exodus 2:23–3:15; Matthew 4:1-11 This sermon is the third in a series on what I have been calling “the cruciform life.” Or, if you like, “the cross-shaped life.” The cross-shaped life is a spiritual paradigm characterized by three features: 1) movement from one way of…

The Cruciform Life: Abraham

The Cruciform Life: Abraham by William Morrow St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Kingston On March 10, 2019 Texts: Genesis 11:27–12:9; Galatians 3:1-14 I imagine that most of us, by this time of year, regard the Winter conditions around us with some degree of discontent. Spring we reassure ourselves is just around the corner. However, when the weather puts the lie to that hope,…

The Cruciform Life: A Biblical Paradigm by William Morrow

The Cruciform Life: A Biblical Paradigm by William Morrow St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Kingston On March 3, 2019 Texts: Deuteronomy 26:1-11; Luke 24:36, 44-49 I’d like to begin by thanking Andrew Johnson and the session of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church for the privilege of preaching from this pulpit for the month of March. Probably, most of you know that I am a…

The Cruciform Life: A Biblical Paradigm

The Cruciform Life: A Biblical Paradigm by William Morrow St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, Kingston On March 3, 2019 Texts: Deuteronomy 26:1-11; Luke 24:36, 44-49 I’d like to begin by thanking Andrew Johnson and the session of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church for the privilege of preaching from this pulpit for the month of March. Probably, most of you know that I am a…

The Unexpected Truth by Trish Miller, sermon on Luke 4: 21-30

I felt very privileged this past week to attend a panel discussion on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The speakers shared their ideas on how we can move forward for better relationships among aboriginals and non-aboriginals. One of the panel members, Bishop Mark MacDonald who is the National Anglican Indigenous Bishop, made a statement that I thought is very relevant to our gospel reading this morning. “The truth will set you free but first it will probably really ….” Let’s just say it’s not going to make you happy. But getting through the truth is necessary to start reconciliation. And likewise, without reconciliation, we have learned nothing from the truth.

Speaking truth to power is a dangerous game

Meyers goes on to say, “Mark has come clean; Jesus (a.k.a. the stronger one….) intends to overthrow the reign of the strong man, i.e, the scribal establishment represented by the demon earlier in Mark. This is Isaiah’s prophecies coming to fruition as God is making good on the promise to liberate the prey of the strong and rescue the captives of the tyrants (Isaiah 49:24). Those who live with power, comfort and empire might find such an interpretation offensive and shocking, yet Meyers points out that this image of Jesus breaking and entering is hardly a new one as Matthew describes Jesus coming as a thief in the night.

Taking the story forward through the working of the Holy Spirit

Experiences of God can be dramatic, can be more subtle, but they most often surprising, unexpected and sometimes not even asked for. Pentecost is about the power and grace of God being spread widely and almost indiscriminately. Jesus chose ordinary folks to be his first followers, people who by no means had it all together, disciples who sometimes seemed to have an incredible ability to not get the message and need Jesus to illustrate and re-illustrate what he meant. Pentecost is the beginning of these ordinary people becoming extraordinary Christians, indeed people that we hold up 2000 years later as some of the best examples of faithfulness and insight.